To the end of the earth… or this corner of it anyway

You may have noticed that I’m not blogging much lately. I’ve been outside enjoying our beautiful spring! The first half of May was record-breaking warm and dry, but the past week or so we have had some rain showers. The rain probably came at the perfect time for my gardening friends. For me it just means bringing rain gear when I go out for my daily run, hike, or walk.

The other day we took a trip out to Neah Bay, the last town at the northwest tip of the Olympic Peninsula. Just outside of town there is a trailhead that leads to Cape Flattery, which is the absolute northwest corner of the lower 48.

Do you ever look at maps and dream of going to the most remote places you can find? The year I lived in Scotland I wanted to go to John O’Groats at the far northern tip of the mainland, but I never quite had the guts to make the trip.

I first came to Washington state on a family vacation in the 1960s. We went to Rainier National Park. There was this other national park out there called Olympic, but my dad decided not to go there. As I recall, he told us, “it’s too remote — they only paved the road and put in electricity a few years ago.” I think the truth is that the road and electricity out to Neah Bay were 30+ years old at that time — still relatively new, but not brand new. In any case, my dad instilled this part of the world with a certain mystique for me. Funny how I felt so drawn to the Olympic Peninsula as an adult and ended up moving here… partly because it reminds me of Scotland… and partly because it’s at the northwest corner of the map.

But I digress.

The trail to Cape Flattery winds through a mossy, boggy forest. It’s wet enough that large sections of it are boardwalk — otherwise the trail would be ankle-deep mud for most of the year. The boardwalk makes the trail not merely usable but also very scenic.

The trail winds gently downhill for about a mile. It ends abruptly at the edge of a vertical cliff! Several small lookouts give different vantage points on the surf crashing against the rock walls far below.

In the next photo you can see that the sea has created caves that run far underneath the cliffs. When the surf is high, it’s possible to feel the cliffs shuddering as the big waves hit the rock with a BOOM! We didn’t feel that on this occasion, but the sight is still very impressive. Someday the rocks we were standing on will split away from the cliff and stand alone as sea stacks.

This is Tattoosh Island, just offshore (and no doubt formerly attached). There’s a small lighthouse which I believe is operated by the Coast Guard. We could hear steller sea lions barking on the island.

As you might imagine, we saw lots of birds, but they were impossible to photograph from far above. I was most excited to see pelagic cormorants, with their very distinctive white patch behind the wing. These aren’t your typical cormorants you see hanging around in harbors.

After walking back up the trail to the car, we continued southward down the Pacific coast a couple of miles to Hobuck Beach, which I understand is a popular surfing spot for those folks who are nutty enough to surf in 48 degree water. There was only one intrepid surfer out that day in the relatively flat (non-booming, if you’ll recall) surf.

Hobuck Beach is sandy (rare for these parts) and almost completely flat (also rare). On another day when I have more time I think I’ll return to run on this beach!

Cape Flattery and Hobuck Beach are about a two and a half hour drive from my town… far enough away that coming here is a day trip and always a bit of an adventure. Yet I have met several people who have come from across the country and even beyond to stand at the northwestern corner of the map. There is something irresistible about going to the end of the earth and coming back to tell the tale — isn’t there?

Maybe I should go to John O’Groats someday.

Is there a place on the corner or the farthest edge of a map that has always called to you?

6 responses to “To the end of the earth… or this corner of it anyway

  1. Norway’s arctic circle. Which is funny since I hate to be cold.

  2. Cape Flattery is a great place. I had a great time there a number of years ago. The boardwalks are pretty cool.

  3. Your photos are gorgeous, Lori. I didn’t know you lived in Scotland for a year. That must have been an amazing time. And it is interesting that the Pacific Northwest has some areas of similarity. You are at home in the changeable weather and beauty of the remote areas. I don’t have a real yen to be somewhere too remote. In fact, it would probably take me a while to calm down if I ever experienced too much solitude. It would be an interesting experiment. Perhaps one day! :-) Glad to hear from you whenever you can post…it’s good you’re enjoying yourself in other ways!

    • Debra, I went to Scotland (the University of Edinburgh) for my junior year at UCLA. It was life changing in so many ways. Besides learning to love cool green-and-blue places, I acquired a taste for Scottish and English ales, which inspired me to try home brewing all the way back in the late 1970s. I should have stuck with that… I would have had a very different life had I become a professional brewer!

      Ah well, it’s never to late to slow down and become happy. :-)

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