Tag Archives: Olympic National Park

Back in the saddle again!

Spring in the Pacific Northwest is a magical time of year. The days get longer, quite obviously, increasing by minutes from day to day. At yesterday’s solstice, we enjoyed a full 16 hours, 4 minutes of sunlight, bookended by long twilights. It’s hard to sleep much past 5:00 AM this time of year.

The long days couldn’t arrive at a better time! With my April marathon and June half marathon now behind me, I’ve turned my full attention to cycling. The Seattle to Portland (STP) ride is now less than a month away. That’s 206 miles, two back-to-back century rides amidst a throng of 10,000 cyclists. My longest ride so far this year has been a paltry 47 miles, but at least I’m now riding almost daily and spending as many hours as possible in the saddle.

Given that I live in the Pacific Northwest, that often means riding in the rain. I found myself cringing at the idea of riding my expensive road bike on a trail that, while paved, can get muddy in places. So I bought a second bike. I call it my a-rainy-day-is-not-an-excuse bike. The geometry is essentially the same as my road bike, but it’s heavier and sturdier, which means it’s a bit less twitchy and a lot less fussy on messy surfaces. I’m enjoying going back and forth between the two bikes — now when I get back on the road bike, it feels even faster!

I do most of my training rides solo. I stay close to either home or the car, riding a series of long loops or out-and-backs so that I’m not too far out in the middle of nowhere should anything go wrong. On those rare occasions when CFL and I can synchronize our schedules, we’ll do a longer ride to a destination together. For the most part, however, he does his training his way and I do my training my way.

His way mostly involves riding up hills. Last year, in preparing for Ride Around Washington (RAW) I rode at least twice as many total miles as he did (and spent many more hours), but he did a lot more hill-climbing. To my surprise, he came through RAW at least as well as I did, so this year I’m trying to include more hill training.

We are fortunate to live right at the foot of a world-class hill! Hurricane Ridge, at 5,242 feet, is one of the highlights of Olympic National Park. It’s also considered one of the best, most scenic cycling climbs in the USA. I live at an elevation of 300 feet. The top of Hurricane Ridge is 18 miles from my front door. That’s a lot of hill climbing in a very short distance!

For me the climb is a long, slow slog. The grade varies from 6-8%, which is not impossibly steep — but it’s nearly constant. It certainly gets the heart pumping, especially near the summit when the elevation becomes a factor. So far this year I’ve only made it halfway up, whereas CFL has gone the whole way several times. The views are spectacular, and the adrenaline-packed descent is the final reward for the climb.

Two short weeks after STP, we’ll do Ride Around Washington again. This year we’ll ride 437 miles in 6 days from Walla Walla, WA to Metaline Falls in the far northeast corner of the state. Although it’s another huge goal, it’s not as intimidating as STP because there are only 250 cyclists, and we are well-pampered with catered meals, hot showers, and luggage services. It’s a sort of traveling summer camp.

After that, I’m flirting with the idea of doing a duathlon. There’s a local one planned in mid-August: a 5K run, a 22-mile bike ride, and another 5K run. A triathlon is out of the question because I refuse to get in the water… but run/bike/run? Yeah, that’s tempting.

It’s good to be back in the saddle again!

So many photo ops!

It has been much too long since I last blogged here! As usual, I have a good excuse: I’ve been too busy living to write.

So what have I been up to? Instead of trying to write about it all at this point, it might be easier to show you.

We had a short, if occasionally dramatic, winter. A series of large rainstorms in February did major damage to our Olympic Discovery Trail. The mudslides have long ago been cleared from the waterfront section, but the big bridge across the Dungeness River is still closed. The river has permanently (well, for the foreseeable future) changed course, and the whole western side of the bridge will need to be rebuilt.

It’s possible to detour around this section of the trail by road, but it does make long bike rides a bit more complicated.

To the west, the Elwha River is finally running clear again after the historic removal of the two large dams. It’s great to see that pure blue-green water!

In April we drove down to Monterey, California to ride the Sea Otter Gran Fondo. The Sea Otter Classic is one of the largest competitive bike events in the country, and the Gran Fondo is one of the few non-competitive events included in it. We rode 51 miles of the beautiful coast of Monterey and Pacific Grove. We were having so much fun riding that I never took any photos along the route! But here we are enjoying the lunch afterward.

We came home with 24 bottles of Pliny the Elder, which we happily shared with several of our friends.

Meanwhile, Port Angeles has been in the news. You may have heard about the Polar Pioneer, a large off-shore oil rig that Shell wants to deploy in the Arctic. It was moored in our harbor for nearly a month before making its way to Seattle, where it was greeted by hundreds of protestors. We didn’t like it being here either, so it was a relief to see it go, even though each move puts it that much closer to its intended destination.

It is huge! At over 400 feet tall, it was the largest thing in view from everywhere in town, but especially imposing viewed from right on the waterfront.

We’ve been so busy we’ve hardly had time to brew beer, but we’ve gotten a few batches done. Meanwhile I’ve judged several times and have now been promoted to Certified rank. I was also asked to judge at a commercial competition, the Washington Beer Awards, where I judged mostly robust porters and barleywines. It was a real honor to participate, and I can’t wait for the results to be announced so I can find out who brewed those tasty beers that my team judged!

This past weekend I ran another half marathon, and earned another PR on a very warm day. You can read more about that here.

Yesterday I celebrated my half marathon with an easy hike. We had a destination in mind, but we turned around early when we met up with this mother and baby.

We could have just shooed them off and hiked on. The Park management wants hikers to shout and throw rocks to discourage them from approaching people. But we could see and hear other hikers shouting just a bit further up the trail, so we knew there were several goats and that some of them were refusing to budge. Soooo, it was time for us to go.

And it’s time for me to go now too. I haven’t ridden my bike since a couple of days before the half marathon. It’s time to get out there and enjoy this beautiful day!