Tag Archives: slowhappycycling

Our activity streak: Mid-year update

Today is the 190th day of 2013 — just past the halfway point of the year. Although I haven’t yet moved far from my computer this morning, as of last night I’d run, walked, hiked, and biked a total of 972 miles. I’ll hit 1,000 miles in less than a week from now.

Neither CFL nor I have missed a single day of human-powered forward motion. I have dutifully logged my every mile in one of my famous spreadsheets. CFL is a bit more casual about his record keeping so I can’t report his actual mileage, but his daily activity streak is intact.

We’ve walked through airports and around shopping malls to keep the streak intact. On road trips, we’ve driven out of our way to find interesting small towns where we can sample the local craft brew and then walk around downtown for an hour or so before getting back in the car.

So far I have run 464 miles, walked 401 miles, hiked 91 miles and ridden my bike 16 miles.

I really need to ramp up the biking miles! Next month we are going to Portland to ride the Bridge Pedal — a 33-mile ride over ten of Portland’s Willamette River bridges. I’m still not comfortable riding my bike on a public road, much less in close company with a few thousand other riders. I’m more nervous about running into another cyclist and causing both of us to fall, than I am about riding on a public road. As I understand it, the bridges themselves will be closed to auto traffic during the ride, but I’m not sure about the roads between the bridges.

It’s time to seriously increase the hiking miles as well. The mountain snow is almost gone, and I want this to be the year when I finally do an overnight backpacking trip.

And oh yes, the running miles are going to ramp up considerably as well, as I move into the serious weeks of training for my first full marathon. Within a week or two I plan to ease myself through the first big psychological barrier — running more than 13.1 miles (the half marathon distance) on one of my Sunday morning long slow runs.

I’ve discovered that if you spend enough hours outdoors, it’s possible to get a tan even in western Washington.

I’ve discovered that the home brew tastes even better when you’ve been out there earning it step by step!

Our friends have grown accustomed to seeing us together walking around downtown. These days I never drive anywhere within a radius of about three miles from home, unless I’m planning on bringing back a large load of groceries. We’ll be ready for the next gasoline panic — we’ll simply keep walking.

When we started this thing at the beginning of the year, I honestly didn’t think we would continue it for long. Now — barring serious injury or illness — I can’t imagine not being active every day. About a month ago I was moving some large plant pots around in the back yard and somehow managed to drop a concrete block on my foot. It was seriously bruised but not broken, so I walked… slowly… the same afternoon.

Today’s plans call for an easy walk downtown for the twice-monthly meeting of the Tuesday Night Beer Research Group. The group’s motto is “We drink to learn!”

Tomorrow I’ll hit the trail again for a 7 mile run. Then I think a high-altitude hike would go well, a bit later in the week. And another bike ride of course! The possibilities are endless.

Slow and happy — one step at a time!

A bit of this, a dash of that

Wow, time flies when you’re having fun! Has it really been two weeks since I’ve posted here?

So what’s new? Two more batches of beer! On January 30 we brewed our spring seasonal, which was supposed to be an English Barleywine but seems to want to be an Imperial IPA. I guess we’re starting to figure out how to get the most “bang” out of our hops. We’ve named this big boy, which will finish somewhere in the neighborhood of 9%, “The Ides of Festivus XIII.” We will give this beer a long aging period and debut it in mid-March.

Then on February 8 we brewed our third American IPA, and I think we finally got this one hoppy enough (see my comment above about finally figuring out how to properly nurture our hops). This batch has the working title of “Take 3,” for obvious reasons. We’ve been focused on the American IPA style recently because our homebrewers club is having an IPA contest in March, complete with a genuine, certified beer judge. Take 3 should be ready to drink by early March, so this was our do-or-die batch. We’ll enter it and see what happens.

On the exercise front, our activity streaks continue. We’re both working on increasing our daily distance (he’s on his bike, I’m running). As the days grow longer, it gets easier to find large blocks of time to get out there and go. We’re already looking closely for the first signs of spring flowers on the trails — it won’t be long now.

We have a major travel adventure planned within the next several weeks… I’ll tell you more about it as we get closer, but you won’t hear all the awesome details until after we return…

Life is good! It’s a wonderful thing to be happy and healthy. CFL and I both feel very fortunate to be able to do the things we are doing. I intend to enjoy every one of these moments as fully as I possibly can. Even if it means I don’t sit down to blog very often.

Until next time…

Daring to do more: Our activity goals for 2013

The other day I wrote on my running blog that I’d barely met my 2012 running goal of 600 miles, and that I planned a modest increase to 650 miles in 2013 (my intention was to increase the running miles while still making room for more hiking this year). Well, the other morning CFL and I got to talking, and wouldn’t you know it, we ended up challenging one another to some rather ambitious activity goals for the year.

I’m not sure which numbers he finally settled on, but here are my goals:

  • Run 730 miles (an average of 14 miles per week, 61 miles per month)
  • Hike, walk, and bike an additional 470 miles (an average of 9.1 miles per week, 39 miles per month)
  • All of which totals up to 1,200 miles (an average of 3.3 miles per day, 23.1 miles per week, 100 miles per month)

The last I heard, he was talking about 1,000 miles total plus 100,000 vertical feet. This time of year he climbs 1,000 vertical feet of stairs (111 flights) every 2-3 days, and in the warmer months he likes to ride his bike up to Hurricane Ridge, a 5,000+ foot climb in 17 miles. So as daunting as it sounds to me, 100K vertical feet is actually realistic for him.

We started out the new year with a nice easy 1.5 mile hike to Marymere Falls and back. As usual we stopped to take photos of a bridge. This one is over Barnes Creek, just below the falls.

Here we are at the falls. Yes, it was COLD.

Yesterday I walked downtown and back, which is about 2.5 miles. I was, therefore, a bit off my planned 3.3 miles-per-day pace when I went out to run today. After an overnight low of 29 and a heavy frost, I wasn’t all that eager to get out there and run. I finally made it to my favorite trailhead around 2:00 PM, when it had warmed up to a positively balmy 37. At least the sun was shining! I was wearing brand new trail running shoes. I don’t normally use trail running shoes on pavement, but it feels like a prudent choice for this time of year.

Sure enough, today I ran through both mud and ice, and I was very glad for the extra traction that those knobby trail shoes gave me!

I ran just over 6 miles, giving me 10 total for the year so far and putting me right on track for my goals.

Meanwhile CFL put his bike on his car rack today, drove to meet a friend, and rode 21 miles with him. Arggghhh! He’s ahead of me! The race is on.

I’ll try not to bore you with too-frequent status updates, but I will try to post periodic updates on how we’re doing with our activity goals.

One mutual goal that we’ve discussed at some length and agreed upon as a “must do” this year is the hike across Olympic National Park — 44 miles of steep trails and stream fords from the Quinault River to the Elwha River. With training we think it’s realistic to do this in three days. As I have never done an overnight backpack trip before, there will be quite a bit of training needed on my part.

Of course we also have this time-consuming but very enjoyable goal of brewing 25 batches of beer in 2013. I think it’s going to be a busy year. But I’m not going to stress out about it.

In fact, right now I think I’ll relax and have a homebrew. Cheers!

Running to the Elwha

In prior posts I’ve written about hiking up the Elwha (here and here) and riding to the Elwha. Well, yesterday I ran to the Elwha! With just a few days left in 2012, I’m only a few miles short of my goal of running 600 miles in 2012. From our prior experience of riding our bikes 6.6 miles on a nearly-level trail to the Elwha River bridge and back, I knew it would be an easy, beautiful out-and-back run.

The skies were gray but there was nothing more than drizzle in the forecast. CFL loaded up his bike and we drove out to the trailhead just west of town. He completed two out-and-backs during the time it took me to do the run, so we had several chances to say “hello” to each other along the way.

It was a perfect day to be outside and active. As usual for this time of year, my feet went numb in the first half mile but I was toasty by the time I’d completed my second full mile. The piles of big-leaf maple leaves that I’d enjoyed running over on my bike were long gone and the paved trail was wide open and non-slippery. With all the leaves off the maples, I could see middle-distance views toward the river.

I stopped to take a photo of the two-level bridge as I approached it. Runners/bikers/walkers use the lower level; the upper level is for cars.

Then I stopped in the middle of the bridge to take photos of the river. It’s still extremely muddy. I read the other day that only about 10% of the century’s worth of silt has reached the mouth of the river since the dam removal process started, so there is a lot more mud yet to come!

Elwha River

After a slow, refreshing several minutes of gazing down at the river, I turned around to head back. The ever-so-lightly uphill trail led me back through the trees, past the airport, and toward town.

Olympic Discovery Trail near the Elwha River Bridge

I picked up the pace for the last two and a half miles, as it was beginning to drizzle. CFL’s post-ride grin was as big as mine! We both enjoyed our exercise highs for the rest of the day.

I’m learning that at this time of year we have to go out and grab whatever exercise we can get, whenever the weather offers a halfway decent chance. This time of year it’s all about seizing the best moment to run, or bike, through the raindrops!

Wherever you are, whatever your weather, I hope you find your ways to enjoy your mid-winter moments… slowly and happily!

Riding to the Elwha

I keep coming back to the Elwha River, it seems.

And why not? It’s a beautiful place in the midst of an astonishing transformation, as the two century-old dams are being taken down and removed.

I’ve written here several times about our hikes up the Elwha, upstream from the dams where the river has always run free. I’ve written elsewhere about the changes already taking place at the former Lake Aldwell after the lower dam was removed earlier this year. The removal of the upper dam has been slower and more painstaking due to the immense amount of silt that has accumulated behind the dam in Lake Mills. I have not been able to show you photos of the process of draining this lake because the construction company has kept the site well shielded from the public. I have managed to catch glimpses through trees and construction barriers, however, so I have had a general sense of the declining water level.

A week or so ago they announced that the river was finally falling free over the last few remaining feet of the dam, and that the silt would soon be flowing downstream and muddying the lower reaches of the Elwha.

This sounded like an interesting thing to go and see. Yesterday we decided to ride our bikes to the Elwha. We started a mile or so west of downtown, at an access point to a newly-paved section of the Olympic Discovery Trail (ODT). We guessed it would be about five miles each way, but were surprised to see a sign indicating it was only 3.3 miles! Given that we had the afternoon free, we decided to ride at a leisurely pace and enjoy the sights.

This new section of the trail was absolutely beautiful, nearly flat and mostly straight through fields and groves of big leaf maples. Once I got over my initial caution, it was great fun to aim my bicycle wheel toward the biggest piles of leaves I could find!

This being the rainy, wet Pacific Northwest, we got to cross another stream on our way to the Elwha. I couldn’t get a decent shot of the oddly-named Dry Creek — it was running freely but was almost hidden by the thick trees. Maybe that’s the joke? In any case, the bridge was terrific! This style of bridge is typical of most of the small stream crossings on the ODT.

After Dry Creek the trail headed gently downhill toward the Elwha, but it never got steep because it follows an old railway grade and crosses the Elwha at the top of the ravine. I was able to relax and not worry about having to ride up steep hills on the way back!

The bridge is very impressive. It’s a new double-deck bridge with a road on top and the ODT below. CFL laments the loss of a beautiful old bridge that was taken out when this one was built. I remember that bridge — I even drove over it once or twice. It was a bit scary! I’m glad the new bridge is there and I appreciate its human-friendly design that encourages leisurely river watching. Doesn’t this beautiful bridge make you want to ride your bike across it — stopping along the way for a long slow look?

As for the Elwha, yes it is muddy!

Looking upstream straight into the sun the view was difficult to photograph, but the river looked like a roiling cauldron of mud. We spent a long time watching the patterns that emerged in and moved through the cross-currents. The flows, ebbs, and whirlpools are somehow easier to see than they would be in clear water.

In contrast, the view downstream seemed serene. Even here, however, the water was obviously thick and murky. I like the shadow of the bridge in this photo. If you look closely you can see us standing there!

The silt flow is expected to continue for weeks to months. The dam removals were planned as a slow and careful process to prevent too much silt rushing out all at once — but no matter how slowly you take down a 100-year-old dam, everything behind it does get up and move downstream eventually.

We plan to keep coming back to check on the river’s ongoing transformation. We’ve heard that the stark lakebed of the former Lake Aldwell, which we last visited in May, is now lush with new growth as the forest comes to reclaim it. It’s definitely time for a return visit!

Further upstream, perhaps once the leaves are fully off the trees, I hope to be able to sneak a peek-a-boo photo of the former Lake Mills.

You can expect to read more here about the Elwha River… It is a place/time event that does, indeed, keep me coming back.